Saab 96 Sedan 1964 – two-stroke

Saab 96 Sedan 1964 - before restoration
Saab 96 Sedan 1964 – before restoration

I have had this two-stroke 1964 Saab 96 Sedan for several years and been restoring it on and off.

It is not made to original specs and has several modifications:

  • 850 cc 3-cylinder engine with triple carburetors from a 1966 ”longnose” Saab 96.
  • Electric fan and fuel pump. Alternator instead of the original generator.
  • 4-speed gear box.
  • Clutch housing and driveshafts are of the later ”hand grenade / potato masher” type, which makes it possible to install front disc brakes. At the moment the car has 1966 type drum brakes.
  • A significant amount of corrosion repairs has been done also.
  • Original colour was ”Midnight Blue” but has been changed to ”Polar White” from the Saab 9-5 color book.

Here are all the project posts on the two-stroke:

After restoration.
After restoration.

12 thoughts on “Saab 96 Sedan 1964 – two-stroke”

  1. Hi Tommy!
    I am considering to ”overfill” the gearbox on my two stroke 96 MY 1965 (4 speed) with Castrol EP90. This means 2 liters of oil as recommended by Niklas in his XP Manual.
    I wondered if you have tried to do so, and what experiences you have made?
    Best 2stroke greetings from Denmark,
    George

    1. Hi George!

      I have not tried to overfill the gearbox. I always use the recommended amount. So unfortunately I can’t really say anything about it…

      But if you try it let me know if there’s any difference.

      Best regards,

      Tommi

  2. i am in process of restoring a Saab 850 Gt. I removed the Bendix electric fuel pump and replaced it with one that appears to be working. The filter is clean and the it pulsates. I have it placed so that the filter is on the up side. Is that correct. That is the top with the nut that opens t he top is on top. Thanks for any; help you can give me. Eddie Adelstein

  3. My mother is trying to sell my grandmothers 64 Saab needs restored and I don’t know how much it’s worth or where to start looking. Any help would be appreciated.

    1. Hi Jennifer,

      the price depends a lot on condition. Could you send me a couple of photos to take a look at? Also the location matters, as the cars are rarer in some countries than others.

      Best regards,

      Tommi / http://www.saabisti.fi

  4. I am having difficulty in finding a gas tank for a 1962 bull nose saab. I have found two tanks, but they are damaged. Are there any universal tanks that can be use.

  5. Hi Tommi,
    I am putting my first car back on the road- ’64 96. Going thru brakes and got gas tank cleaned and repaired. Here is a question- what is the little brass knurled knob that sticks out of the passenger side corner of the heater core box? My book doesn’t mention it. Thanks John from Maine.

    1. Hi John!

      Nice to hear you are putting a two-stroke back on the road. The knob is a valve used to let air out of the cooling/heater system. When you put in fresh cooling fluid start the car and keep the valve open until a steady stream of fluid comes out, then close it.

      Hope this helps,

      Tommi

      1. Thanks for that info! I have never touched it in 30 years. Do you know of a pattern on-line someplace for making the small mud flaps that go in front of the rear wheels? A simple thing to make but it would save time if I had a pattern ready-to-go. Thanks!

  6. Tommi
    I have 4 NOS Bosch distributor caps (part number 1 235 522 055) for SAAB 3 cylinder 2 stroke engines. Would you be interested? Do you know of anyone who might need them?
    Thank you, Dan. Charlotte, NC USA 011-704-821-7023

  7. Hello Tommy, Still working on my ’64. I have had my gas tank repaired and no leaks. It was silver-soldered on the filler end. The problem now is that there is restriction in the fuel pipe inside the tank. I tried running some stiff steel wire in there but it bottoms out. What is inside the tank? Is there a screen at the end of the intake? Is there an easy way to open it up so it flows better?

    1. Hello John!

      Take a look at this pic here: http://photobucket.com/gallery/user/llovegrace/media/bWVkaWFJZDozNDA4MDA1OQ==/?ref=
      It’s from a two-stroke tank but I think the V4 fuel intake has a similar box around the ending of the fuel line. Usually old oil and gas in the two-stroke cloggs up the small holes. Can happen in V4 also.

      I don’t think there’s a really good method of clearing the holes without cutting the tank open. Some have removed the fuel sender and scraped the holes somewhat clean with a stiff wire. You could try some solvent / paint thinner also. And compressed air in reverse direction. Maybe someone offers a service to wash / clean the insides of the tank?

      If you come up with good solution to this, please let me know.

      Best regards,
      Tommi

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